Welcome to your “Even” lesson! In this topic we talk about:
• When do we use “Although” / “Though” / “Even though” / “In spite of” / “Despite”?
“Although”
• “In spite of” / “Despite”
“Although” / “In spite of” / “Despite”
“Though” and “Although”
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When do we use “Although” / “Though” / “Even though” / “In spite of” / “Despite”?

Have a look at these examples:

Last month James and Samantha had a holiday in the mountains. It was really cold but they enjoyed themselves:

Although it was cold, they enjoyed themselves.”

In spite of the weather, they enjoyed themselves.”

Despite the weather, they enjoyed themselves.”

“Although”

After “although” we use subject + verb:

Although it was cold, we enjoyed ourselves.”

“They didn’t let me in the cinema although I had a ticket.”

Compare “although” and “because”:

“We went on holiday although it was cold.”

“We didn’t go on holiday because it was cold.”

“In spite of” / “Despite”

After “in spite of” or “despite” we use a noun, a pronoun, or “+ing”:

In spite of the cold, we enjoyed our weekend.”

“I wasn’t well, but in spite of this I went on holiday.”

Despite being ill, we went to the restaurant.”

You can say “in spite of the fact” and “despite the fact.”:

“I didn’t get the job in spite of the fact that I was qualified.”

“I didn’t get the job despite the fact that I was qualified.”

Compare “in spite of” and “because of”:

“We went to the cinema in spite of the snow.”

“We didn’t go to the cinema because of the snow.”

“Although” / “In spite of” / “Despite”

Compare these three expressions:

Although the rain was bad, we went to the restaurant.”
or
In spite of the rain, we went to the restaurant.”

“I couldn’t concentrate although I had just had a coffee.”
or
“I couldn’t concentrate despite just having a coffee.”

“Though” and “Although”

Sometimes we use “though” instead of “although”:

“I couldn’t concentrate though I had just had a coffee.”

In spoken English, we sometimes put “though” at the end of sentences:

“The rice was terrible, I liked the vegetables though.”

“I see my neighbours every day, I’ve never spoken to them though.”

“Even though” (not “even”) is a stronger version of “although”:

Even though I had just had a coffee, I was tired.”

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“Even”

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