In this lesson we’re looking at expressing nationalities in English. Let’s look at the words that help us talk about the origins of people and objects.

Have fun with the lesson, and don’t forget to try the quizzes.

– James.

Lesson Contents

Country nationalities

Adjectives formed from country names can be used to describe both people and objects that come from that country:

He’s a Scottish footballer.

They’re Scottish pastries.

Please note: The suffix -MAN at the end of nationalities does not necessarily mean that the person is male. -MAN can also mean -PEOPLE.

Country

Adjective

Person

People

Language(s)

Britain

British

a Brit

the British

English, Welsh, Gaelic

Scotland

Scottish

a Scot

the Scottish

English, Gaelic

France

French

a Frenchman

the French

French

Germany

German

a German

the Germans

German

Spain

Spanish

a Spaniard

the Spanish

Spanish

Argentina

Argentinian

an Argentine

the Argentinians

Spanish

The USA

American

an America

the Americans

English

Switzerland

Swiss

a Swiss

the Swiss

German, French

New Zealand

New Zealand*

a New Zealander

New Zealanders

English

China

Chinese

a Chinaman

the Chinese

Mandarin, Cantonese

*only used for objects, not for people

Complete the table that is similar to the one you’ve looked at in the lesson.

Country nationalities

As well as country nationalities, towns and areas can also have their own words.

Town / Area

Adjective

Person

People

London

London*

a Londoner

Londoners

Paris

Parisien

a Parisien

Parisiens

Florida

Floridian

a Floridian

Floridians

Manchester

Mancunian

a Mancunian

Mancunians

Canberra

Canberran

a Canberran

Canberrans

*only used for objects, not for people

Match the answers to the questions.

All Quizzes