“Will” & “Shall” 2

   

 
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Welcome to your “Will” & “Shall” 2 lesson! In this topic we talk about:
• More about “Will”
Words often used with “Will”
“Will” with the present
Other uses of “Shall”
Take the quizzes when you’re ready! If you’re having problems, use the comment box to contact our English Teachers.

More about “Will”

As previously discussed, we do not use “will” to talk about something that has already been arranged or decided:

“We‘re having a party tonight.”
(not “We will have party tonight.”)

“Will” is often used for the future when we are not discussing what someone has decided to do:

“You‘ll pass your driving test, I’m sure of it.”

In this case, the subject “you” hasn’t decided to pass the driving test, the speaker is simply giving his prediction. Here are some more examples:

“When you come to my place tomorrow, we‘ll have a great time.”

“Don’t go near that dog! It‘ll bite you.”

“When will you make your famous English breakfast again?”

Words often used with “Will”

  • Wonder:

“I wonder what will happen.”

  • Expect:

“She hasn’t heard from her parents in ages. I expect they’ll call soon.”

  • Sure:

“I’m sure you’ll pass your driving test.”

  • Probably:

“I’ll probably be working late tonight.”

  • Think:

“I think I’ll have a beer.”

“Will” with the present

Strangely enough, “will” can be used to talk about the present in certain situations. In this example, the speaker is predicting what is happening now using “will”.

“Don’t bother texting James now, he‘ll be busy.”
(He will be busy now)

This situation is very rare, however.

Other uses of “Shall”

“Shall” is normally only used with the subjects “I” and “We”. With positive sentences, “shall” can be replaced by “will”:

“I shall be late for lunch.”
(or “I will be late for lunch.”)

“We shall probably have a holiday in June.”
(or “We will probably have a holiday in June.”)

In spoken English, however, we use “will”.

The negative of “shall” is “shall not” or “shan’t”:

“I shan’t be busy tomorrow, we could go out.”
(or “I won’t be busy…”)

“Shan’t” can only be used with “I” and “we”, not with other subjects. (“He”, “She”, “It”, “They”, “You”)

Recap

  • We do not use “will” to talk about something that has already been arranged or decided.
  • “Will” can be used to talk about the present in very rare situations.
  • With positive sentences, “shall” can be replaced by “will”.
  • “Shan’t” can only be used with “I” and “we”.